Fast tips and tricks to easily fix poor Wi-Fi at home

Fast tips and tricks to easily fix poor Wi-Fi at home

Routers are increasingly becoming some of the most reliable devices out there, simply because they provide a feasible means for one to continuously be connected to the internet.

However, as important as they are, the mechanics behind routers tend to have their own issues here and there, especially because of the cumbersome hardware that is normally employed in creating and housing these said components

That being said, as humanity becomes increasingly automated, and reliable on the internet increases tenfold, it is imperative that people adopt the future by handling the little issues that occasionally interrupt the router, without having to always contact customer support. Here are some of the ways one can effectively achieve this.

Speed and coverage

Though it might be possible to have a high-tech wireless routers having multiple antennas attached to it, a majority of people do not have the financial muscle to do so. Hence, for most, the router will basically be the proverbial structure designed from plastic, with a singular antennae as the key Wi-Fi transmitter. If anything, this router is quite average, having pretty basic Wi-Fi range. It’s no surprise that complaints tend to arise whenever one increases their distance from the focal point of the transmitter.

That being said, to get stronger Wi-Fi, perhaps it’s time that a majority of the populous considered newer Wi-Fi routers; ones that particularly support 2.4 GHz, or alternatively 5GHZ frequencies.

In fact, a 2.5 GHz has much more pronounced coverage over longer distances, albeit lower speeds; while a 5GHz has limited distance coverage, but remedies this weakness with much faster speeds.

Creating your personal mesh network at home

Perhaps one happens to have areas in the home, or even around the current vicinity, that frankly has dead Wi-Fi zones? If that’s the case, then one essential remedy is to increasing the number of Google WiFi units present in the room, and ultimately have them connected wirelessly to the main component system located in the living room, or one’s work area.

The excess Google Wi-Fi units will play the role of nodes for that wireless network seamlessly, enabling one to partake in high speed Wi-Fi’s as well as downloads, similar to the same speed being relayed by the main unit.

That being said, for optimal control, one can also effectively learn how to change WiFi password on Windows 10 if they want to have full control of their Wi-Fi network.

App Control

Last but not least, another essential facet provided by Google Wi-Fi is effective app control, thanks to its unique, albeit user-friendly interface. Do take note that it further comes endowed with an effective speed test, as well as another critical feature that enables it to seamlessly prioritize bandwidth for any given device.

To add to such pleasantries, one has the ability to control advanced router options such as PPoE, WAN, and DNS, just to mention a few.

While in the event that one is a family person, he or she (they) have the ability to regulate the hours that younger family members in the abode spend surfing on the internet.

In a nutshell, Google Wi-Fi is taking significant leaps and bounds to assert their dominance in the Wi-Fi market sphere.

About the author, The Nice Guys on Business

At first listen, it may not sound like they are talking business, but there is no denying the Nice Guys (Doug Sandler and Strickland Bonner) know their audience. If you are an entrepreneur and tired of hearing the same old rah rah static babble on all the other business podcasts out there, it’s time for a breath of fresh air. Listen in, subscribe, or join the Nice Guy Community and become a Funk’nFan of the show. Relationships, honesty, trust and integrity build business today and that’s what the Nice Guys are all about. Top industry experts interviewed, behind the scenes. Sometimes raw, sometimes explicit, always fun and informative. Looking for canned questions, short format and conversations in a box…this podcast ain’t for you.

Leave a Comment